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On To Sacramento, song lyrics

Song: On To Sacramento
Lyrics: Mario Casetta(1)

Music: Mario Casetta
Year: 1947
Genre: Folk
Country: USA


Oh, we'll get our friends together, as many as we can.
Pile into jalopies(2) and make a caravan.
We'll call upon the governor and legislature too.
And we won't come back until we put our housing program through.

On to Sacramento. On to Sacramento(3).
And we won't come back until we put our housing program through.
This song was originally posted on protestsonglyrics.net
We will stop off in the valley at cities on the way.
Join with other people who want to have their say.
Then on to Sacramento, the crowd will pass the word.
And we'll camp right at the capital to make our voices heard.

On to Sacramento. On to Sacramento.
And we'll camp right at the capital to make our voices heard.

Now we mailed a lot of letters and sent out telegrams,
Telling how the people were needing housing plans.
We didn't get an answer when we wrote him before,
So it's on to Sacramento to knock on Warren's(4) door.

On to Sacramento. On to Sacramento.
So it's on to Sacramento to knock on Warren's door.
This song was originally posted on protestsonglyrics.net
We're demanding rental housing and we don't mean a tent.
No restrictive covenants and ceilings on the rent.
If they can put out millions for highways in the state,
Then they can put up housing or we'll give them the gate.

On to Sacramento. On to Sacramento.
Then they can put up housing or we'll give them the gate.
On to Sacramento. On to Sacramento.
And we won't come back until we put our housing program through.


Notes:

1 - Mario Casetta information. Mario Casetta was a member of the People's Songs an organization founded by Pete Seeger and others in the last half of 1945.

2 - Jalopies, a term for old automobiles.

3 - Sacramento, capital of the U.S. state of California.

4 - Earl Warren (1891-1974), who won three consecutive terms as California Governor beginning in 1942. Later he went on to to become the Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court.